Lunchmeat, Olives and Happy Homemakers « Shoot Me Now

Shoot Me NowLunchmeat, Olives and Happy Homemakers

Lunchmeat, Olives and Happy Homemakers
Published on Tuesday, April 5, 2011 by

The secret to every beautiful homemade casserole?  Decorative lunch meat.  Who knew?

Who doesn’t love homemade macaroni and cheese?  Except for the tomatoes on top, I loved my mother’s the most.  This weekend my mother and daughter and I decided to indulge.  Hot, cheesy, fat-filled heaven in a casserole.

But do you know what was even better than the actual food?  The Better Homes 1961 Casserole Cookbook the recipe came out of.  I traveled through time with each turn of the page, amazed at both the creativity and diversity of this eclectic cookbook.

better homes casserole

When I first opened this curious book I found myself staring at an array of cooking vessels that rendered me nearly unconscious.  My heart belongs in the past, when women worked in the kitchen while children hung to their apron strings.  On these yellowing pages were pictures of electric saucepans, super-ceramic skillets and chafing dishes. All tools of the trade in a time I can only dream of.

old cookware

This cookbook was written with great excitement! After all, what happy homemaker could deny the exhilaration one can feel when preparing a home cooked meal! It seemed that every page included not one, but up to four exclamation points per paragraph!

60's book

None of the recipes call for cheese, but rather, processed cheese.  Wikipedia states that processed cheese contains some “normal cheese,” as well as emulsifiers, salt, whey and extra food colorings.  Was this the beginning of the end for America?

processed cheese

Every homemaker wants to prepare food that is not only delicious but also appealing to the eye.  This is why Better Homes suggests topping your casseroles with lovely creations made completely out of deli meat.  Olives and parsley were the icing on the cake.

old food picture

I particularly like the “meat horn” effect.  This shouts out, “meaty, yet decorative too!”

1960's food

Remember when Stouffer’s introduced the “all new” French bread pizza?  The 1960’s had already Been-There-Done-That!  Yet on the very same page you will find a meal that Stouffer’s has yet to take on.  The infamous Bread Egg Salad Vienna Sausage Pickle pizza.  You have my permission to take this idea and run with it.  No, really.

funny food

The pièce de résistance? Feast your eyes on this Confetti Rice Ring prize.  Rice, peas and pimento stuffed to the gills with creamed chicken.

rice ring recipe

Creamed chicken WHAT,  I am not sure.  It seems they aren’t so sure themselves.  “COULD be ham, sea-food sauce.”  COULD BE?  OK, you take the first bite.  I dare you!

rice mold

Now, if you excuse me, I have some meat horns to prepare!

 

mom blog

  • Tfteenchef

    Normally I say that I will try anything once. As long as you know what it is. No “could be” about it. If you”ll excuse me, I have to go figure out what creamed chicken is…

  • Now I’m hungry. I’ve not had breakfast yet and all this looks so very good.

    Have a terrific day. 🙂

  • We need to see the follow up pictures of your meat horns, and… and invitation! Yum! 🙂

    • I think I chickened out on the meat horns… BUT… tomorrow I am grilling the “secret recipe” Red Robin Teriyaki burgers… you are all invited! 🙂

  • That is fantastic. I love looking through old cookbooks. They did so much with tinned fruit. And I remember those rice rings. My aunt used to make them all the time. The meat horns are hilarious!

    • I have actually never seen a rice ring in my life. Maybe you could make one for me? But please, not the creamed turkey stuff in the picture…

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  • I had to read this post, as the title got me intrigued for sure. Sorry but the picture in the cookbook would have made me turn the page and quick. Not something I would crave, lol

  • I have to say that these are some great recipes. That French bread pizza looks delicious.

  • Stephanie Thompson

    Great cover on the cookbook – I think we used to have those salt and pepper shakers. A bit scary to have the food industry pushing “processed” foods as early as 1960.

  • I’m sorry, but none of those look appetizing at all to me.

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